16

Part of the Area 51 process is finding people familiar with the network model and know how other sites on our network operate. That experience is necessary in order for a new site to function properly. Reputation on Area 51 is extremely different than on other sites. You can easily get large amounts of it by just having been the person to propose the site or ...


15

Elrond Network has one of the strongest community in the blockchain space and massive engagement from both new devs and non-tech folks. You can check the numbers here -> https://growth.elrond.com/ and just check the Awareness tab. We have thousands of people in different countries actively contributing on different collaterals and co-projects around ...


10

Simply put, an entire Q&A site specifically for a pandemic is not a viable site. We do not create sites for such specific topics, especially one that will eventually pass and become somewhat obsolete in the future. A site only about COVID would never be accepted on our network, regardless of the community behind it. In general, epidemiology questions are ...


10

In my opinion the influx of new users is normal given the fact that the proposal is only 1 week old. Elrond also has a strong community that is increasing day by day, and it is reasonable to deduct that a lot of new users that are interested in the project are coming from those communities. I do not understand the reason why would you close a proposal that ...


9

No, you cannot join using multiple accounts as that would inflate the number inappropriately. If you have two accounts, you can request that they be merged together by contacting us. You may even be able to complete the merge yourself if you are eligible for the automated system. If you don't want the accounts merged, you'll need to make sure to leave from ...


8

This is because of the volume of recent new followers to the area 51 site. This is what the official FAQ page says: A good Q&A site needs a lot of people to support it, so users are asked to invite their friends and help build the community. This is what we did. The Elrond project has a big community. Maiar was installed 575,000 times! Only one of the ...


7

Yes, we do. However, keep in mind that nobody works over the weekends and, in this particular case, Monday was a US holiday.


6

To be more direct and general about your question: evidence. A list of users that recently joined the site to follow a proposal means very little. We already run checks to make sure there is no irregular voting propping up a proposal when we do our proposal review at the beginning of the commitment phase (or somewhere around that time). If we see a lot of ...


6

I personally would not jump to conclusions without taking into account the entire context. The way I see it for this particular case, but I feel most points could relate to any topic: The number of accounts you see are a result of community mobilisation on other platforms which leverage communication, but have the main problem of being intrinsically linear, ...


4

I'm thinking of proposing a new topic, but am unsure if I can build a community around it yet. Then don't propose it. You must already have a community, see the FAQ All we ask is that you have an enthusiastic, committed group of expert users who check in regularly, asking and answering questions. and Changes to the Area 51 Process v3.0 If it doesn't ...


4

Yes and no. Technically speaking, the proposal being deleted would mean you no longer get the reputation for anything that was on the proposal. It would all be removed the next time your reputation was recalculated, if ever. There are no special rules (e.g. 60 days, 2 upvotes) for keeping reputation permanently on Area 51. However, Area 51 does not perform ...


4

Yes you can absolutely fulfill commitment well after Private Beta. You have 180 days (6 months) to fulfill commitment, and Private Beta lasts for only 2-3 weeks. Remember also that when you clicked commit, it said "I agree to post at least 10 questions or answers within the first 6 months of the Beta", and did not say it has to be "private&...


3

As far as "how much" there is only one real metric: the minimum number of commitments. A proposal needs at least 200 people committed to use the site in order to succeed at the second phase. So if a community is smaller than 200 people, a Stack Exchange site is simply not for them yet. We have closed proposals where we have noticed the listed ...


3

Area 51 runs on a very old Stack Exchange codebase, so changes on regular Q&A sites aren't always ported over. One of the reasons could be (but I'm just speculating) that the change on regular Q&A sites was to make sure questions were awarded just as much as answers: We’re changing the reputation earned from getting a question upvote to ten points, ...


3

You said : "There could also be voter fraud (meaning people creating multiple accounts and then voting up as many questions to 10 votes as possible)" But it doesn't make sense. Why would anyone waste time making multiple accounts (when it takes so long to make an account) just to vote multiple times, while the Elrond community is huge? Here is a ...


2

Pick one. The category doesn't really matter -- the only place it will be used is here on Area 51. For "military", I'd put it under either "Life" or "Culture", as those are the two vaguest categories.


2

Yes. See the answer here: Why doesn't Area 51 have its own Meta?, which was posted by a former Stack Overflow employee: According to Robert Cartaino, the Area 51 Discussion Zone is intended to serve as A51's per-site meta so its reputation system is tied to the main Area 51 site, just like with regular Q&A sites and their metas.


2

You can't see your failed commitments anywhere as far as I know. You would have to go back to the individual sites and see yourself in the commitment list, and then compare this with your "Fulfilled Commitment" list to see which ones were failed.


1

I guess you can do two things: Post a question in the Discussion Zone, like you did. Flag the proposal for moderator attention: Those are the standard ways on the Stack Exchange network to notify a moderator. A flag is less noise and you can be certain it will be read, because it ends up in a queue.


1

No. ♦ moderators used to be appointed by Stack Exchange staff, chosen from subject matter experts and users already familiar with moderation tasks on other Stack Exchange sites. Nowadays, they often hold elections, just like on main sites. See this recent example.


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